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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
and fast. >> reporter: president obama used his first interview since his re-election to drive home his insistence that key to the u.s. beginning to pay down its debt and avoid going over the fiscal cliff is raising tax rates on the wealthiest americans. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up, and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: if republicans agree to do that, the president told bloomberg television, he'll agree to serious spending cuts. republicans have offered to raise taxes on higher incomes by $800 billion, not by raising tax rates, but by eliminating some deductions and loopholes. during last year's budget showdown, the president said he wanted to do exactly that. >> what we said was give us $1.2 trillion in additional revenues, which could be accomplished without hiking tax rates, but could simply be accomplished by eliminating loopholes, eliminating some deductions and engaging in a tax reform process that could have lowered rates generally while broadening the base. >> reporter: but now the president does not. he says it wi
ahead and affirm that i think same sex couples should be able to get married. >> reporter: on election day last month, voters approved gay marriage at the ballot box for the first time, after dozens of defeats, when maine, maryland and washington state legalized it. but now, it all comes down to the nine justices of the supreme court, and they are generally conservative on social issues, though they're closely divided. for opponents of gay marriage, the very fabric of our society is at stake. >> the fundamental reason why marriage is treated as a public institution rather than a purely private relationship is because it serves the interest of society and the interest of children. >> reporter: edie windsor thinks it's simpler than all that. if you could talk to the supreme court as they consider this case, what would you tell them? >> it's a marriage that anyone would want, okay, gay or straight. we had a wonderful life together. >> and terry, right here again. so, when will the court rule on this and do you have any sense at all which may they may go? >> reporter: so they've got two ca
their future to the presidential palace. they want president mohamed morsi, the man they elected, now to be removed for seizing too much power. last night, the same street was a war zone. six killed, 700 injured. the biggest crisis here since egypt, one of america's most important arab allies, overthrew its dictator, hosni mubarak. these very same people filled these same streets two years ago. today, they are chanting the exact same songs, only replacing mubarak's name with morsi's. tonight, morsi refused to give up the absolute power he seized to write a new constitution. one that many here feel doesn't protect the rights and freedoms they fought so hard for. >> he has become like using -- you didn't like mubarak, it is worse than mubarak. >> reporter: the president's defiance has only increased the tension here. and tonight, these people vow to fight on in the name of democracy. diane? >> nick schifrin in cairo tonight. >>> and now, we return back here at home, to made in america, claiming a kind of victory tonight. the american powerhouse, apple, famous for its giant manufacturing
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)